Ruth Marshman the Witch of Shepton Mallet, Somerset, England

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Ruth Litman (1805 - 1878)

The wife of Charles Marshman

 

~ ca. 1805

Ruth Litman was born ca. 1805 in Shepton Mallet, Somerset.

Her mother or grandmother may have been Elizabeth Litman.  In the 1841 census of Shepton Mallet, Charles and Ruth Marshman was living in the household of a Elizabeth Litman age 75.

When searching the internet, there seems to be people with the last name of Litman in Shepton Mallet going back to the 1600's.

 

~ 1834

Ruth Litman had a daughter, Jane Litman, baptized 24 November 1834 at Shepton Mallet, Somerset.

The information comes from an entry in the website of FamilySearch.org. 

Ruth Litman married her husband, Charles Marshman, about three months later.  It is not certain if he was the father of Jane Litman.

From this entry it then is not certain if Charles Marshman was the father.

 

~ 1835

Ruth Litman married CHARLES MARSHMAN on 19 January 1835 at Shepton Mallet, Somerset.

The information comes from an entry in the website of FamilySearch.org.  The husband's name was recorded as "Charles Marsham".  Don't know if it is an error on the original record or a transcription error by the folks at FamilySearch.

 

~ June 1841

In 1841, Chars. And Ruth Mashman were living in the household of Elizabeth Litman at "Quar" in Shepton Mallet, Somerset.  Chars. Mashman was a Labourer.

Elizabeth Litman was probably Ruth's mother or grandmother.

From the 1841 census of Shepton Mallet:

Name - Age Sex - Profession - Born in County ?

Quar

Elizabeth Litman…………. 75 F………………….………….… y
Chars. Mashman……….... 25 M….. Labourer………….... y
Ruth…….. Do…………..…… 30 F………………….…………… y
Jane……… Do…………….….. 4 F…………………..…………… y
Sabina….. Do………….…..….. 3 Mo F……………………….… y
Robert Litman……….……… 10 M……………………..………. y
Mary Ingram…………………. 45 F… washing woman…... y
Henry Stokes…………………. 20 M… Labourer……….…… y

 

~ 1850

Charles and Ruth's daughter, Sabina Marshman died at the age of 8 or 9 years old.

 

~ March 1851

In 1851, Charles and Ruth Marshman were living at Quarr Street in Shepton Mallet, Somerset.  Charles was a Labourer.

From the 1851 census of Shepton Mallet:

Name - Relationship to Head - Married or Single - Age - Sex – Occupation - Birthplace

Quarr Street

Charles Marshman…. Head… Mar… 39 M….. Labourer……………. Somerset [Sr]oscombe
Ruth………. do………… Wife…. Mar…. 40 F…… Silk [Th]raster…………. do….. Shepton Mallet
Jane………. do………… Daur……………. 14 F…………… do……………………. do……… do
Henry……. do…………. Son………………. 8 M…… [----- ] Labourer………. do……… do
Henry Bartlett………… Lodger… U…… 19 M….. Farm Labourer………… do……… do

 

~ June to July 1854

In July 1854, Charles Marshman and William James were charged with stealing a quantity of wool in Shepton Mallet, Somerset.  Charles Marshman was acquitted but William James was found guilty.

From the newspaper, Wells Journal - Saturday 08 July 1854:

Charles Marshman, 44, and William James, 22, were charged with stealing a quantity of wool, the property of John Luff, of Shepton Mallet.

William Webb, in the employ of the prosecutor, stated that his master's sheep, 145 in number, were shorn in June last; two of the fleeces were taken home, and the remainder were put in a cupboard, under the stairs of an empty house belonging to his master; the door of the house was not locked; on Monday week last the whole of the fleeces in the house were safe; he went to the house on the Tuesday following, and on opening the door one of the fleeces fell against the door, and the others were strewn about; his master's son afterwards came and counted the fleeces with him, and they then found 118 there; the sheep from which the wool was taken were Downs, Devons, and cross-breeds; on Friday last a constable showed him some wool (24 fleeces), which he knew to belong to his master by a mark across the shoulder.

Frederick Taylor, wool rug manufacturer, of Baltonsborough, remembered the prisoners coming to his house, on Thursday, the 29th of June, with two sacks of wool; James said he had some wool for sale, and asked witness to buy it; he said that he must see it first; James then showed the wool, and witness told him to weigh it; he did so, and witness asked him to take it into the loft, that he might see the sample; witness then told James that he could not think of buying wool of men of his description, and he was not that sort of man to come by it honestly; during this conversation the other prisoner was outside, and he sent for a constable, who took them into custody; the wool was worth about £4; Marshman took no part in selling the wool.

William Luff, son of the prosecutor, corroborated the principal part of Webb's evidence.

A statement made by the prisoners at the time of their committal was read.  Marshman said that James gave him 2s. to carry the wool to Baltonsborough, and James said he found the wool outside the Downside turn-pike gate.  In defence, Marshman said he was quite innocent of knowing as to how James came by the wool, and James repeated his former statement.

Marshman was acquitted, but James was found guilty, and it being shown that he had been in custody on seven different occasions, he was sentenced to eighteen months' hard labour.

 

~ December 1854 to January 1855

Charles Marshman was convicted of stealing 80 lbs. of coal and sentenced to twelve months hard labor.

 

From the newspaper, Bristol Mercury - Saturday 13 January 1855:

Somerset Adjourned Session

Imprisonment. - Twelve Months: Charles Marshman, stealing 80 lbs. of coal, the property of Albion Allen, of Shepton-Mallet.

 

And from another newspaper, Wells Journal - Saturday 13 January 1855:

Charles Marshman, 45, was charged with stealing 80lbs. of coal, at Shepton Mallet, the property of A. Allen, on the 16th of December.  Guilty: three former convictions were recorded against him, and he was sentenced to twelve months' hard labour.

 

~ November 1856

Ruth Mashman, a reputed witch, was charged and convicted of extorting money and she was committed to the Shepton-Mallet house of correction for six weeks.

This case described some of the items that were part of her witchcraft.  Such as the enchanted box, when opened the devil's portrait, by Mashman, in colours, was found inside, together with a verse of scripture written backwards, and some toads' legs.

From the newspaper, Sheffield Daily Telegraph - Saturday 08 November 1856:

WITCHCRAFT.

A woman named Bathe preferred a charge against Ruth Mashman, a reputed witch, for extorting money, at the petty sessions, Shepton-Mallet, on Wednesday last.

It seems that Mrs. Bathe applied to the witch to have her assistance in breaking the spell of another witch upon her husband, who lately has been very unfortunate in his undertakings.

Mashman agreed to charm away the spell, and as a remuneration she obtained a coup of onions, a great portion of the woman's clothes, and a large sum of money; indeed, she was in the habit of paying the credulous Mrs. Bathe a visit whenever she wanted any of the above articles, which was pretty frequently.

Mrs. Bathe one day, needing the witch's advice on some point, paid her a visit, and at the end of the conversation had a small box given her, with strict injunctions not to open or show it to any one but her husband.  Shortly after her coming into possession of the box she became very ill, and believed herself under the influence of the witch's craft, and the little box was considered the cause of illness.

At this point two "wis acres," respectable farmers, were consulted about the box, but on being told that the witch had averred the house would be blown up on its being opened, they declined doing it; and a man named Rood was sent for, who declared his readiness to open the enchanted box though the devil himself was there.

The box was opened, and sure enough the devil's portrait, by Mashman, in colours, was found inside, together with a verse of scripture written backwards, and some toads' legs.

The discovery led to the taking up of Mrs. Mashman, and it being proved she had obtained money, &c., by unlawful means, she was committed to the Shepton-Mallet house of correction for six weeks.

In the same woman's house, on it being searched a few weeks ago, Police-Constable Emery stepped on a loose stone, and on its removal discovered a crock containing several toads.

It is probable the practice has been handed down from the days of Shakespere of preserving under a stone, as in Macbeth: -

Toad that, under coldest stone, Days and nights hath thirty-one Sweltering venom sleeping got.

- Bristol Advertiser.

 

~ July to August 1858

Jane Marshman pleaded guilty to stealing wearing apparels and the parents.  Jane was given one month's imprisonment.

Charles and Ruth Marshman, were indicted for receiving the stolen articles with a guilty knowledge.  It appears that the charges were dropped for the parents as no bill was found against them.

 

From a newspaper, Wells Journal - Saturday 07 August 1858:

Jane Marshman (23), for stealing wearing apparel from Elizabeth Keen, at Wells, on the 27th July, pleaded guilty.  One month's imprisonment.  No bill was found against Charles and Ruth Marshman, the parents of the prisoner, who had been indicted for receiving the articles with a guilty knowledge.

 

From another newspaper, Sherbourne Mercury - Tuesday 10 August 1858:

On Monday last, Jane Marsham was charged before the city Magistrates with stealing from Elizabeth Keen, certain articles of baby linen, lace collars, muslin, &c., and Charles Marshman, and Ruth, his wife (who reside at Shepton Mallet), were also charged with receiving the things, knowing them to have been stolen.

After hearing Mrs. Keen's evidence and that of the policeman (Rawlings, No. 242), who apprehended the prisoners, the magistrates committed them all for trial at the ensuing assizes.  It is said that Charles Marshman is a ticket of leave man, and that his wife has been also convicted of a felony.

 

From a third newspaper, Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette - Thursday 12 August 1858:

BILLS IGNORED.

- Edward Heath, for felonious assault on Charity Brooks, a child 8 years of age, at Wiveliscombe; Charles Marshman and Ruth Marshman, charged with receiving stolen property at Wells.

 

~ April 1861

In 1861, Charles and Ruth Marshman were living on Pike Lane in Shepton Mallet, Somerset.  Charles was a Labourer.

From the 1861 census of Shepton Mallet:

Name - Relationship to Head - Married or Single - Age - Sex – Occupation - Birthplace

Pike Lane

Charles Marshman… Head… Mar… 48 M……… Labourer……… Somerset Croscomb
Ruth……… Do……….. Wife…. Mar…. 50 F…………………………………… Do…. Shepton Mallet
Henery….. Do……….. Son….. Un……. 16 M……. Farm Servant……….. Do…………. Do
John……… Do… Grand Son.. Un……… 6 M………………………………….. Do…………. Do

 

~ July to September 1861

There was a court case, Burgess versus Charles Marshman, concerning Mr. and Mrs. Marshman's refusal to quit the place that they were renting.  Charles Marshman claims that the landlord won't let him leave.

From the newspaper, Wells Journal - Saturday 21 September 1861:

Burgess v. Charles Marshman.  Refusal to quit.

His Honor, (to defendant):  Why do you not give up possession?  Defendant:  When I am going out he will not allow me (laughter).  His Honor:  What do you mean?  Defendant:  It is not for the rent I owe him.  I have witnesses to prove that he will not allow me to go out.  We are willing to go, but when we attempt to do so he stops us.

Plaintiff:  Well, your Honor, that does not seem very reasonable.  I have given defendant several notices; here is one of them.  When I given defendant's wife the last notice, she said she would see me, the judge, and everybody else b---------- before she would go out.

The last notice was served on the 16th July.  Defendant was a weekly tenant, and should have left the house at the end of the week.  I have not had the arrears of rent (£1 19s.) and defendant's wife said she would see me ---------- before she would pay me anything.

His Honor decided that defendant should give up possess on in a week.

 

~ May 1862

Ruth Marshman was charged with being a rogue and a vagabond, and pretending to tell fortunes.  She was convicted and sentenced with two months' imprisonment, with hard labour.

From the newspaper, Wells Journal - Saturday 10 May 1862:

FORTUNE TELLING.

- An old woman, named Ruth Marshman, who has previously been in gaol for pretending to practice the "black art", was brought before E. H. Dickinson and John Hippisley, jun., Esqrs., at the magistrates' office, on Friday last, charged with being a rogue and a vagabond, and pretending to tell fortunes.

The only witness was a well-dressed young woman, named Priscilla Taylor, who said the prisoner met her one day and told her she had something to say to her.  As she could not stop then, she went to Marshman's house some time afterwards, when she told her she could get a young man with a fortune for her, and that they would be married on the following Saturday.

For this purpose she obtained 1s. 10d. and some articles from the girl, to work the "charm".  The prophecy not coming to pass, Priscilla gave information to the police.

The magistrates, sentenced the accused to two months' imprisonment, with hard labour.

 

This case was written by Owen Davies in his book.  He found the deposition of Pricilla Taylor of the case.

From the book, A People Bewitched: Witchcraft and Magic in Nineteenth-Century Somerset:

Page ? - ? (for some reason the page numbers are not shown)

"Cunning-folk were clever at building up the expectations of young female clients with their promises, and milking them of their money or property by pretending to slowly work spells over their future husbands.

This process is well illustrated by the experience of Pricilla Taylor, a single young woman, about twenty years of age, who lived in the Market Place, Shepton Mallet.  The following is her own account of her dealings with the cunning-woman Ruth Marshman, as deposed at Shepton Mallet magistrates' office in May 1862:

On the afternoon of the 20th January last, the prisoner met me in the street, and said she wanted to speak to me; I don't remember ever speaking to her before myself; I then told her I couldn't stop, and she asked me to go and see her, telling me where she lived; I said perhaps I might;

about a month afterwards I was coming home from Wells, when I called to see what she wanted of me; she brought forward some cards, and said she knew young people were fond of meddling with such things; I laughed, and she began to tell me different things; she said she saw by the cards there was a young man who wanted me then, but I was not to have anything to do with him, for she would get a young man with a fortune, whom I had never seen or heard of; that was on Monday, and she said she would get it all done, and we should be married by the next Saturday;

she also said I should enjoy better health than ever I had before; she asked me for 6d, and I gave it to her; I said to her "Do you really think there are such things?" - that was, what she had been telling me she could do; she replied, "Bless the child! I have turned many servants out of their situation and put others in," and said she had brought a Mr. Brown and his wife together; I asked her what the charge was to be for all this, and she told me 1s; but if I had no money she would take something the worth of 1s; I told her I didn't like to let my things go, and I would consider it;

I then went home, but before I had been there a quarter of an hour the prisoner came and asked me if I had made up my mind; I told her I did not know; I hadn't thought of it; she said I had no heart upon it, but I again told her I would consider it, and that I thought it was rather presumptuous work; she said, "Nonsense, girl! There's no time like the present", she also said I needn't be afraid, as it would be all right;

there was a shawl lying across the table, and I said she might have that; she took the shawl, but the young man never came, and I waited so long that I became uneasy about it, and went to her; she said the shawl was all right; she was working over it, and I must not move it, or the charm would be broken;

I afterwards found the shawl had been pawned, but on going and asking her for the pawn-ticket she said if I move the shawl I must give her something else to work upon, or the spell would be broken; she said I must cross my hand with a shilling, and I did so; she took the shilling and spat upon it, and said she could put the charm on again now; she then let me have the duplicate, and I redeemed the shawl;

She came to me some time afterwards, and said she must have something more to keep the charm on, and I let her have a dress; at other times I gave her a mantle, a piece of print, and 4d., because she said what she had was not enough to work with; I let her have all this to get the young man, but he never came.

After hearing Taylor's evidence a lengthy consultation ensued between the presiding magistrates, E. H. Dickenson and John Hipisley.  They finally decided on sending Marshman to gaol for two months with hard labour."

 

~ April 1871

In 1871, Charles and Ruth Marshman were living at Cats Ash in Shepton Mallet, Somerset.  Charles was a labourer.

From the 1871 census of Shepton Mallet:

Name - Relationship to Head - Married or Single - Age - Sex – Occupation - Birthplace

Cats Ash

Charles Marshman…. Head… Mar… 66 M…. Labourer………… Somerset Croscombe
Ruth………. do………… Wife…. Mar…. 66 F………………………………… do….. Shepton Mallet

 

~ 1878

Ruth Marshman died at the age of 73 in the 1st quarter (Jan-Feb-Mar) 1878 in the Shepton Mallet registration district of Somerset.

From the England & Wales, Death Index:

Name: …………………………… Ruth Marshman
Date: …………………………….. Jan-Feb-Mar 1878
Age: ………………………………. 73
Registration District: ………. Shepton Mallet
County: ………………………….. Somerset
Vol.: ……………………………….. 5c
Page: ……………………………… 417

 

~ April 1881

Charles Marshman, age 76 and a widower, was living at his grandson's home at 40 Cats Ash Pike Lane in Shepton Mallet, Somerset.  Charles was a general laborer.

From the 1881 census of Shepton Mallet:

Name - Relationship to Head - Married or Single - Age - Sex – Occupation - Birthplace

40 Cats Ash Pike Lane

John Marshman….. Head… Mar………….. 25 M…. General Laborer….. Somerset S. Mallet
Elizabeth…. Do……. Wife…. Mar…………… 26 F….. Laundress…………………. Do……….. Do
[John?]…… Do……… Son………………………. 7 M…. Scholar……………………… Do……….. Do
Willie………. Do…….. Do………………………… 6 M……… Do……………………….. Do………… Do
Charles…….. Do……. Lodger.. Widower…. 76 M…. General Laborer.. Do….. Croscombe
Albert………. Do……. Lodger…………………. 15 M……………………………. Do…… S. Mallet

 

~ 1890

Charles Marshman died at the age of 81 in the 4th quarter (Oct-Nov-Dec) 1890 in the Shepton Mallet registration district of Somerset.

From the England & Wales Death Index:

Name: …………………………. Charles Marshman
Date: …………………………… Oct-Nov-Dec 1890
Age: …………………………….. 81
Registration District: ……. Shepton Mallet
County: ……………………….. Somerset
Vol.: …………………………….. 5c
Page: ……………………………. 349

 

 

 

 

Children of Charles and Ruth (Litman) Marshman

 

 

1.     JANE LITMAN  was born in Shepton Mallet, Somerset and was baptized 24 November 1834 at the church in Shepton-Mallet.

Her mother's name was given as Ruth Litman, the father's name was not given in the baptism record. 

The information comes from an entry in the website of FamilySearch.org.

Even though that Ruth married Charles Marshman 3 months after the birth of Jane, we do not know if he was the father.

In the 1841 and 1851 censuses, she was listed as Jane Marshman.

Jane Marshman was charged and pleaded guilty in 1858, and her parents were charged too but not prosecuted  (see above in 1858 for details).

 


2.     SABINA MARSHMAN  born ca. 1841 in Shepton Mallet, Somerset.

She was born in the 1st quarter (Jan-Feb-Mar) of 1841 in the Shepton Mallet registration district of Somerset.

From the England & Wales, Birth Index:

Name: …………………………….... Sabina Marshman
Date: ……………………………….. Jan-Feb-Mar 1841
Registration District:…………. Shepton Mallet
County: ……………………………. Somerset
Vol.: …………………………………. 10
Page: ………………………………… 444

 

Sabina Marshman died at the age of 8 or 9 years old in the first quarter (Jan-Feb-Mar)

From the England & Wales, Death Index:

Name: ……………………….. Sabina Marshman
Date: …………………………. Jan-Feb-Mar 1850
Registration District: ….. Shepton Mallet
County: ……………………… Somerset
Vol.: …………………………… 10
Page: ………………………….. 363

 

 

3.     HENRY MARSHMAN  born ca. 1843 in Shepton Mallet, Somerset.

 

 

 

~ Grandson

Also living with Charles and Ruth Marshman in the 1861 census was a grandson, John Marshman, born ca. 1855.

 

4.     JOHN MARSHMAN was born ca. 1855 in Shepton Mallet, Somerset.  It is not known at the moment who were John's parents.

John Marshman married Elizabeth Door on 22 August 1872 at Shepton Mallet, Somerset.

From the newspaper, Western Gazette - Friday 30 August 1872:

Marriages.

Aug. 22, at Shepton Mallet, Mr. JOHN MARSHMAN, to Miss ELIZABETH DOOR, both of Shepton Mallet.

 

In 1878, John Marshman was charged with deserting his family and sentenced to six weeks' hard labour.

From the newspaper, Western Gazette - Friday 29 March 1878:

Shepton Mallet.

Petty Sessions.

DESERTION. -- John Marshman, labourer, was charged with deserting his wife and family, thereby rendering them chargeable to the common fund of the Union.

Mr. F. G. Bradbury appeared on behalf of the Guardians.  Mr. Hawkins, relieving officer, proved the desertion and the chargeability, the amount of the latter being £6 6s.

Defendant pleaded that his going away was in consequence of the drunken habits of his wife.  The Bench, deeming it a bad case, committed prisoner for sex weeks' hard labour.

 

In 1881, John and Elizabeth Marshman were living at 40 Cats Ash Pike Lane in Shepton Mallet, Somerset (see above at ~ 1881 for census details)

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

1.     1834 baptism of Jane Litman.  "England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index online at https://familysearch.org.  Indexing Project (Batch) Number: I05216-3. GS Film number: 1470976, Reference ID: item 1 D/D/RR368A p 17.  Searched on July 7, 2013 Sunday 1:45 AM.

2.     1835 marriage of Ruth Litman and Charles Marsham.  "England Marriages, 1538–1973 " index online at https://familysearch.org.  Indexing Project (Batch) Number: I05216-3.  GS Film number: 1470976, Reference ID: item 1 D/D/RR368A p 249.  Searched on July 7, 2013 Sunday 1:45 AM.

3.     1841 birth of Sabina Marshman in the index.  England & Wales, Birth Index online at Ancestry.com.  Date: Jan-Feb-Mar 1841; Registration District: Shepton Mallet; County: Somerset; Vol.: 10; Page:  444.  Searched on July 18, 2013 Thursday 3:25 PM.

4.     1841 census of England, Somerset, Shepton Mallet, 4, Page 2, Ancestry.com.  Public Record Office reference HO 107/963/12 , Original Page No. 1, household of Elizabeth Litman.  Searched on July 7, 2013 Sunday 1:24 AM.

5.     1850 death of Sabina Marshman in the index.  England & Wales, Death Index online at Ancestry.com.  Date:  Jan-Feb-Mar 1850; Registration District: Shepton Mallet; County: Somerset: Vol.: 10; Page: 363.  Searched on July 18, 2013 Thursday 3:28 PM.

6.     1851 Census of England, Somerset, Shepton Mallet, 4e, Page 14, Ancestry.com.  Public Record Office reference H.O. 107/1933, Original Page No. 13, No. of Householder's Schedule 58, Household of Charles Marshman, searched on July 5, 2013 Friday 12:27 AM.

7.     1854 Charles Marshman charged with stealing wool.  Wells Journal - Saturday 08 July 1854.  From The British Newspaper Archive online at http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk.  Searched on July 6, 2013 Saturday 4:12 PM.

8.     1854-1855  Charles Marshman convicted and sentenced.  Bristol Mercury - Saturday 13 January 1855 and Wells Journal - Saturday 13 January 1855.  From The British Newspaper Archive online at http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk.  Searched on July 6, 2013 Saturday 12:53 AM and 1:01 AM.

9.     1856 Ruth Mashman, a reputed witch, charged and convicted for extorting money.  Sheffield Daily Telegraph - Saturday 08 November 1856.  From The British Newspaper Archive online at http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk.  Searched on August 25, 2012 Saturday 2:03 PM.

10.     1858  Jane Marshman pleaded guilty for stealing.  Charles and Ruth Marshman indicted for receiving the stolen articles.   Wells Journal - Saturday 07 August 1858, Sherbourne Mercury - Tuesday 10 August 1858, and Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette - Thursday 12 August 1858.  From The British Newspaper Archive online at http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk.  Searched on July 6, 2013 Saturday 12:14 AM, 12:34 AM and 12:41 AM.

11.     1861 census of England, Somerset, Shepton Mallet, 9, Page 24, Ancestry.com.  Public Record Office reference R.G. 9/1661, Original Page No. 20, No. of Schedule 118, household of Charles Marshman.  Searched on July 7, 2013 Sunday 12:32 AM.

12.     1861 court case Burgess v. Charles Marshman over refusal to quit.  Wells Journal - Saturday 21 September 1861.  The British Newspaper Archive online at http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk.  Searched on July 6, 2013 Saturday 2:37 PM

13.     1862 Ruth Marshman was charged with being a rogue and a vagabond, and pretending to tell fortunes.  Wells Journal - Saturday 10 May 1862.  The British Newspaper Archive online at http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk.  Searched on July 6, 2013 Saturday 12:21 AM

14.     1862 Ruth Marshman case described in a book.  A People Bewitched: Witchcraft and Magic in Nineteenth-Century Somerset by Owen Davies, published by David & Charles, Oct 1, 2012.  Google Books online. Searched on July 17, 2013 Wednesday 12:59 AM.

15.     1871 census of England, Somerset, Shepton Mallet, 9, Page 20, Ancestry.com.  Public Record Office reference RG 10/2443, Original Page No. 19, Stamped Page No. 33, No. of Schedule 114, household of Charles Marshman.  Searched on July 7, 2013 Sunday 12:26 AM.

16.  1872  the marriage of John Marshman and Elizabeth Door.  Western Gazette - Friday 30 August 1872.  From The British Newspaper Archive online at http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk.  Searched on July 18, 2013 Wednesday 4:12 PM.

17.     1878 death of Ruth Marshman in the index.  England & Wales, Death Index, online at Ancestry.com.  Date: Jan-Feb-Mar 1878; Age: 73; Registration District: Shepton Mallet; County: Somerset; Vol.: 5c; Page: 417.  Searched on July 7, 2013 Sunday 12:41 AM.

18.  1878  John Marshman charged with deserting family.  Western Gazette - Friday 29 March 1878.  From The British Newspaper Archive online at http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk.  Searched on July 18, 2013 Wednesday 5:02 PM.

19.     1881 census of England, Somerset, Shepton Mallet, 9, Page 26, Ancestry.com.  Public Record Office reference RG 11/2405, Original Page No. 25, Stamped Page No. 103, No. of Schedule 129, household of John Marshman.  Searched on July 7, 2013 Sunday 1:04 AM.

20.     1890 death of Charles Marshman in the index.  England & Wales, Death Index, online at Ancestry.com.  Date: Oct-Nov-Dec 1890; Age: 81; Registration District: Shepton Mallet; County: Somerset; Vol.: 5c; Page: 349.  Searched on July 7, 2013 Sunday 12:59 AM.

 

 

 

First published July 18, 2013 Thursday 5:32 PM

 

 

Researched and Compiled by William Wallworth

 

 

 

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